NICOLA CARRINO

Biography:

Nicola Carrino was born in Taranto on 15 February 1932 and lives and works in Rome.

He taught sculpture at the Fine Arts Academy until 1992. He is national academician of St. Luke. He has been exhibiting since 1952. His first personal exhibition was in 1958, and from 1962 to 1997 he belonged to Group 1 in Rome.

In 1969 he created his Transformable Constructors, modular steel sculptures and over the years carried out various Transformations in art galleries and the city. Since 1967 he has been designing and producing sculptures for the town, landscape and public buildings.

Form and Space are the fundamentals of Nicola Carrino’s work, who began sculpting at the beginning of the Seventies to satisfy his desire to let form develop and transform itself in relation to its location communicating with the external space.

He made his first iron and steel sculptures between 1968 and 1969 called Transformable Constructors, with a very impressive impact. The works are placed in space in relation to their installation and form part of the urban view and complex urban construction becoming in turn sculptures to be lived in.

Nicola Carrino’s work, with the Constructive first and the Deconstructive after, are complex urban sculptures that dialogue with their surroundings and the city life and landscape.

Nicola Carrino’s last works are the Deconstructives, produced between 2005-2006, and they are extremely large and visually impressive, redesigning the layout of their location provoking the onlooker’s gaze and giving a new perception of the surroundings. Large single structures made from stainless steel tubular rods measuring 200 x 100 mm, with frames broken up by diagonals and crosses placed longitudinally or slid into the depths.

Steel is a decisive choice in Carrino’s work: the hand ground surfaces reflect and return colour and light, the changing weather and surrounding colours and become absorbed themselves into the context, cancelling each other out to then be regenerated in a presence-absence transformation process which distinguishes the way sculpture and architecture can live together.

The Deconstructives are formed of three sculptures:

The Deconstructive Albornoz Project 2005, situated at the right of the facade of the Albornoz Palace Hotel in Spoleto, formed of 3 squares measuring cm 294 x 294 in hand-ground AISI304 tubular steel measuring mm 200 x 100, crossed through by a diagonal to form a parallelepiped measuring cm 294 x 598 x 152.

The Deconstructive W. Project 2005 was made for situating outside a museum in Rome, formed of three rectangles measuring 2×4 m, in AISI304 stainless steel tubular bars measuring mm 200 x 100.

The Deconstructive Artehotel Project 2006, another tubular steel structure is in Perugia between the Hotel and the car park.

Marzia Urettini