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The art of making: the relationship between theory and practice in working steel.

Handicraft firms and small-medium enterprises are a precious source of professional expertise and employment, which is highlighted even further at a time of crisis, especially if one considers the metallurgy and steel transformation sectors. The term “task” defines any, mainly, manual activity that is generally learned from practical experience and apprenticeships and conducted with the […]

Handicraft firms and small-medium enterprises are a precious source of professional expertise and employment, which is highlighted even further at a time of crisis, especially if one considers the metallurgy and steel transformation sectors.

The term “task” defines any, mainly, manual activity that is generally learned from practical experience and apprenticeships and conducted with the aim of earning an income. Arts and Crafts Schools are of fundamental importance in offering valid alternatives to students, and workers, who want to enter the labour market or who need reintroduction into new types of employment. Their apprenticeship is never exclusively manual, rather an on-going exchange between theory and practice, covering all those elements that enhance both sides, to train a professional whose knowledge and skills are as complete as possible. Professional schools should be constantly motivated and valorised, eradicating those common beliefs that saw them as a “Cinderella” with respect to the education received from the more theoretical schools.

Correct and transparent professional training is a guarantee for the client that skilled workers are available for whom perfection is a constant guiding factor in their work.

Handicraft firms have always been connoted by the central role of business competition, which is bound forever to that of the workers. Competition is often based on the businessperson’s innovative ability: these characteristics mature and evolve more frequently in a context where there is the possibility to increase knowledge by means of diversified training courses, in a systematic manner with the free circulation of ideas and projects which, in the end, become the common wealth of all involved.

Metallurgy, knowledge in working with different types of metals, forge them, weld them, listen to the material and understand how it should be best used, are just some of the basic considerations in a training process for whoever works in this specific field.

In this sense, the “Leading Hand or Leading Craftsman” becomes the ideal bridge between professional training and the business world, a fundamental piece in the puzzle for the company’s development potential.

Marina Cescon
Acciaio Arte Architettura Online